airmail

This post is a quick break from a project that has kept me busy since late last week. It's been a constant chipping away day after day (even while having family over for a barbeque on Sunday) and I'm a bit worn out. The good news is that the client is happy with my work. We're not done yet, so, I may be scarce around here for the next few days.

Backtracking a little, I did start the weekend on a great note. I visited Sew Crafty, Friday night, for their Spring Bling event. I met some lovely people (Sarah, Amie, Erin, Lisa) and had a wonderful time. It's always so energizing to be around creative people. I have awesome news too! I will be teaching a paper craft class at Sew Crafty in the near future. Stay tuned for details to come.



This is a little something I worked on over the weekend and between client approvals. I always need a fun side project to work on because it gives me mental breaks. I specially need the breaks when the project is very 'corporate' and on the dry side. This new printable PDF set is now available in my shop in two color options: blue/red and orange/gray.

My main objective was to come up with a small box that would be suitable for small gifts and in particular for gift cards. Sure, you can always tuck those plastic "credit cards" (like my little C calls them) into a regular note card but a box makes your gift more memorable.



I have no idea why the airmail theme came to mind. I know it isn't groundbreaking at all, but I do have some nostalgia attached to it. When I was little, my parents and I believe my grandmother, used these envelopes quite frequently. I still remember how it felt to hold them in my hands. The paper was thinner and it had a particular crinkly sound when handled. Some of the first letters I received from friends, came in airmail envelopes. They were always such a great sight to see in the mailbox.



I wish I still wrote letters the way I used to. I love technology and all it's conveniences but the joy of sending and receiving a hand written note of any kind can never be replaced.

14 comments:

  1. I have vivid memories of tissue-y paper letters written in French to my Great-Grandmother from our relatives overseas. The braille-like texture of the pressed indentations from the pen nib in words that I couldn't read, even if I understood their elegant cursive writing. They would use up every little bit of space- even going around the perimeter until there was not one millimeter left to write on. Very frugal, indeed! Anyway, these caught my eye - very pretty.

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  2. I love it! Fab design. Getting one of these in the mail would be so special.
    ~Emily

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  3. did you ever get my email about the logo design request?

    great letter design. I still love writing real letters, too.

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  4. Lovely idea! I miss letters too (and have a collection of airmail-weight pads, but no reason to use them).

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  5. Oh that's another great one - tissue-y paper letters! I remember those too Michelle.

    Jademondin - no I didn't receive an email for a logo design. Did you email me recently?

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  6. Love the envelopes! Very cute. I'm really excited about your new book. I need to stock up on paper and sharpen my scissors. It'd be great to see you at a Sew Crafty class too!

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  7. These are gorge! I love them!

    And how exciting that you're teaching a class!

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  8. I have a pen pal for that same reason: nothing can replace real mail, as old fashioned and "un-green" as it may be. I am always so happy to get letters from my friend!

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  9. I remember these from when I was 5 and my Aunty A. lived in Germany. She would always send letters via airmail. I was always excited because she would send me pictures of castles they had visited and I taped them to my wall in my bedroom. Thanks for sharing :)

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  10. I love the orange and gray...very sophisticated looking.

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  11. Oh my gosh! You just brought back a flood of memories! I remember my mom sitting at her desk, writing to the family in Argentina. She would use what we called "onion skin paper." It was super, super thin and crinkly. Obviously, the lighter the paper the cheaper it would be to airmail!

    I haven't thought of that in a long time. Thank you. :)

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  12. I think your project turned out lovely! Great work.

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  13. I love these so much! They remind me of the joy I felt when a letter from my Korean family arrived in my mailbox!

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